We lose a football field of farmland every second to soil erosion and urbanisation. At the same time, global population is expanding at a rate that means we need to produce more food in the next 50 years than we did in the last 10,000.

How to accomplish this sustainably is the 21st century's greatest challenge, because:

  • while nearly a billion people worldwide are starving or malnourished (including a large proportion of farmers), a similar number are overweight, and up to a third of all global food production is lost or wasted each year.
  • If we don't want to encroach upon forests to make space for more agriculture, we need to produce more food from existing cultivated land.
  • competition for water increases between urban and rural environments and access to water is the biggest limiting factor in the world's ability to feed itself.

The future success of agricultural economies and global food security depends upon sustainable ecosystems and healthy communities. With this in mind, even those in urban areas need a better understanding of agriculture.

"There is increasing pressure on rural communities to produce enough food. In 1950, a hectare could feed two people. By 2030, it will need to feed five people."
Jan Brykczyński

Jan Brykczyński

Polish

Professional Commission First Prize Winner for his series “Árnes”.

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Mimi Mollica

Mimi Mollica

Italian

Professional Commission Second Prize Winner for his series of images from Dakar, Senegal.

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Pablo Lopez Luz

Pablo Lopez Luz

Mexican

Professional Commission Third Prize Winner for his artistic approach to the concept of “landscape”.

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Holly Lynton

Holly Lynton

American

Open Competition First Prize Winner for “Turkey Madonna”.

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Vitaliy Popkov

Vitaliy Popkov

Ukrainian

Open Competition Second Prize Winner for “Energy Carriers”.

André François

André François

Brazilian

Open Competition Third Prize Winner for his images from the Mukuru slum in Kenya.